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Research

Below is a summary of the current research across the university.

Research

Below is a summary of the current research across the university.

Māori resilience
Dr Simon Lambert is examining how the recent Canterbury earthquakes affected Māori communities. His research - continuously updated in his blog, has extended to broader indigenous issues, and he recently returned from the United Nations Global Platform on Disaster Risk Reduction, where he was speaking on Engaging Indigenous Peoples in Disaster Risk Reduction.

Community-based and community-led recovery
A cluster of research being led by Dr Suzanne Vallance is taking place in the area of community and grassroots recovery. This research examines how government agencies work with community groups and the effect that planning law and policy changes have had. Find out more about Dr Vallance's research here.

Earthquake-risk impact on property values
Dr Gary Garner is studying the impact of the recently mapped Fault Avoidance Zone (FAZ) on the price and saleability of directly affected property on the West Coast of New Zealand.

Associate Professor John McDonagh is looking at the impact of the Christchurch earthquakes on building owners and tenants in the central business district.

Peter Brent Nahkies is investigating the government proposal requiring the mandatory seismic retrofitting of all earthquake in New Zealand.

Liquefaction and seismic hazards on alpine fault
Associate Professor Peter Almond, together with Dr Pilar Villamor of GNS Science and Dr Martitia Tuttle of M. Tuttle & Associates, and PhD student Monica Bucci are carrying out detailed studies of the geomorphic signatures of the liquefaction events of the Canterbury sequence of earthquakes (2010-2012). The aim is to develop criteria by which sites for studies of past liquefaction events recorded in sediments could be identified. This would form a basis for planning paleoliquefaction studies for quantifying earthquake and liquefaction hazard.

Tourism sector resilience in developing and developed countries
Evaluating the business case for investment in the resilience of the tourism sector of Small Island Developing States is being under taken by PhD student Roche Mahon, together with staff members Dr Hamish Rennie and Professor Susanne Becken. The research is being undertaken for the UNISDR secretariat as part of the preparation for the Global Assessment Report. It includes case studies from the Indian Ocean, Pacific and Caribbean Islands. Current research in New Zealand is focused in Northland and on the West Coast of the South Island and concerns development and implementation of a Tourism Action Plan – this work is led by Professor Ken Hughey and Professor Susanne Becken.