Skip to main content

Disaster Risk Reduction

As New Zealand’s specialist land-based university, Lincoln understand that land and livelihoods are dynamic interacting socio-ecological systems and are vulnerable to natural hazards.  The globally significant 2010-11 and 2016-17 Canterbury/Kaikoura earthquakes and the 2014-17 locally significant droughts and floods highlighted the need for applied, research-informed responses to reduce the risk of disaster from extreme events. This theme is the doorway to Lincoln University’s collaborative, transdisciplinary research and education that aims to increase the resilience of people and communities in New Zealand and overseas to potentially disastrous events. 

The extent of Lincoln University’s involvement in DRR (Disaster Risk Reduction) research means that this research theme has as its primary purpose facilitating the connection of researchers and students working temporarily or permanently on DRR-relevant research with each other and with those beyond Lincoln University.

Disaster Risk Reduction

As New Zealand’s specialist land-based university, Lincoln understand that land and livelihoods are dynamic interacting socio-ecological systems and are vulnerable to natural hazards.  The globally significant 2010-11 and 2016-17 Canterbury/Kaikoura earthquakes and the 2014-17 locally significant droughts and floods highlighted the need for applied, research-informed responses to reduce the risk of disaster from extreme events. This theme is the doorway to Lincoln University’s collaborative, transdisciplinary research and education that aims to increase the resilience of people and communities in New Zealand and overseas to potentially disastrous events. 

The extent of Lincoln University’s involvement in DRR (Disaster Risk Reduction) research means that this research theme has as its primary purpose facilitating the connection of researchers and students working temporarily or permanently on DRR-relevant research with each other and with those beyond Lincoln University.

Research: Being located in a rural area with two of the world’s best living laboratories for earthquake recovery on its doorstep (Christchurch and Hurunui-Kaikoura), and with a strong tradition of adding value to rural wellbeing, food systems, and environmental management in New Zealand and internationally, Lincoln logically provides unique opportunities for collaborative research on reducing the risk of disaster.  It places particular emphasis on building resilience at the individual and community level through better land use planning and policy, food production and environmental management systems, and mitigating and adapting to slow onset and long-term climate change-induced exacerbation of risk.

Practice: Our researchers and students work directly in co-productive research relationships with people and communities, industry and governments to ensure the relevance and robustness of our work beyond the research community. The Lincoln Hub and other direct partnerships play key roles in achieving this.

Education: The knowledge gained is translated directly into our student’s education through PhD research and degrees such as the Master of Applied Science, the professionally accredited Master of Planning, and the collaboratively taught (with the University of Canterbury) Master of Disaster Risk and Resilience and the Post-Graduate Diploma in Disaster, Risk and Resilience.

Lincoln Only Editor Tools